Segregation

(Collection)

This collection began with the Kentucky Oral History Commission's effort to establish oral history programs in each of the state's 120 counties. County libraries worked with local volunteers to collect interviews. Since 1987, county oral histories have been generated primarily by...

(Collection)

This project includes raw audio & video used to make the documentary Living the Story (an extension of the Civil Rights Movement in Kentucky Oral History Project.).The raw footage was also edited to create hour long videos highlighting some of the individuals interviewed for the Living the...

(Collection)

These twelve interviews with Frankfort/Franklin County residents cover their family history in this area. Topics include local families, historic homes, streets, distilleries, entertainment, transportation, neighborhoods, race relations, African Americans, and settlers. Copyright Kentucky...

(Item)

65 minutes. Graves discusses his memories of Adair county, including being driven to school in a car because it was too far to walk. After serving in the military he moved to Louisville, Kentucky and worked on the Kentucky Indiana Railroad as a conductor. In retirement he owns the family farm he...

(Item)

92 minutes. Rev. Sammy Huges discusses his early family history from the 1860s. He remembers his long walk to school as a child and attending the Rosenwald School. He dropped out of school early because he needed to help with family income, taking odd jobs to get by. His familys tobacco base was...

(Item)

66 minutes. Rev. James Washington talksabout his family history and growing up in Lexington, Kentucky. He discusses becaming an ironworker apprentice in Louisville, Kentucky and working on buildings made of concrete and steel. He also discusses volunteering spiritual guidance to men in a drug...

(Item)

76 minutes. William (Billy) Wheat discusses a one-room school that has been turned into a private residence. He discusses travelling out of town to farm someone elses land and shares memories that African Americans were not allowed to eat inside a restaurant during segregation. His memories...

(Item)

162 minutes. Rev. Bobby Bowe talks about his family history and growing up in Columbia, Kentucky, including attending the Rosenwald School. He discusses not riding a bus to school because of segregation. He received an Associates degree in business from Lindsey Wilson College and was drafted...

(Collection)

This project documents well established African American residents of Adair County. Interviewees discussed family history, education, religion and childhood. Topics included segregation, integration, and civil rights activities.

Subscribe to Segregation